The Go Giver

Elisabeth Elliot

The Go-Giver is a book by Bob Burg and John David Mann that illustrates the power of receiving through giving principle through a story. It tells a story of how a young man named Joe learned the five laws of stratospheric success through the help of his friend Pindar, a legendary consultant referred to his friends as the Chairman.

This post is not about the book The Go Giver. This is about someone with great generosity.

Her name is Elisabeth Elliot.

The following is extracted from the book The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader: Becoming the Person Others Will Want to Follow by John C. Maxwell.

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Her name is Elisabeth Elliot. In the early 1950s, she accompanied a group of missionaries to Ecuador with the hope of reaching the Quichua Indians. Among that group was a young man named Jim, who had been courting her since 1947. While they worked together and gave their lives to serving the Ecuadoran Indians, they finally decided to give themselves to each other and were married.

They had been together about two years and had a ten-month-old daughter named Valerie when Jim and four other missionaries felt compelled to make contact with another small group of Indians living in the area called the Auca. The Indians had a fierce reputation. The earliest record of any contact with them was of their killing a priest in the 1600s. Since then, they had attacked every outsider who came their way. Even the other Ecuadoran Indians avoided them because of their brutality.

As Jim and the others prepared to make contact, Elisabeth knew that the five men would be putting themselves in danger, but she was resolute. The two of them had given their lives to this mission. For several weeks, a missionary plot flew a small plane over an Aucan village and dropped supplies and other items as gifts. They even included pictures of themselves to prepare the tribespeople for their first contact.

A few weeks later, Jim and four others landed on a small stretch of beach on the Curaray River and set up camp. There they made contact with three Aucans – a man and two women – who seemed to be friendly and receptive. And in the following days, they met with several others. They told their wives by radio that they seemed to be making significant progress in befriending the tribe.

But then a few days later, the men failed to check in with the base camp at an appointed time. Their wives waited in vain to hear from them. Minutes passed, then hours, and then a day. Elisabeth and the others feared the worst.

A search party went out to look for the mend and radioed back bad news. They had spotted the body of a white man floating in the river. The searchers found the men, one by one. With each it was the same: he had been slashed with Aucan spears. All five of them were dead.

Under those circumstances, many people in Elisabeth Elliot’s shoes would have gone home. It’s one thing to be willing to give up a comfortable life in the United States to help other people; it’s quite another to give up your spouse. But Elliot had a truly generous heart. Despite her terrible loss, she still wanted to help the people of Ecuador. She stayed and served the Quichuans with whom she was living.

What happened after that is even more remarkable. Other missionaries continued trying to make contact with an Aucan village. And after a couple of years, they succeeded. Immediately Elisabeth Elliot rushed to the village. Was it to take revenge? No, it was to work with the people there and serve them. Elliot lived and worked among the Aucan people for two years, and many of them gladly accepted the message of God’s love she carried – including two of the seven men who had killed her husband.

                                                                                                            

The reason I share this story is I have deep respect for people like Elisabeth Elliot. It is easy to give your money to help people. It is easy to extend a helping hand. It is certainly not easy to give your love ones to help people you do not know. To me, Elisabeth Elliot is a true go giver, and her only intention is to be answerable to her own faith, and to spread God’s love.

I have read The Go Giver book and tried to understand the message the book is trying to convey. It is a great book that teaches the values of giving and putting others’ interests first and adding values to them that ultimately leads to unexpected returns. Still, at the back of my mind, I knew I just wanted to be a go giver in order to be a go getter. I had a condition when I give.

Through Elisabeth Elliot’s story though, I understand now truly what it mess to give and to be generous. I learned that when you give, you should have no expectation of return. When you give, you should not count how much you have given. And when you give, you have to give it all. And God shall favour the true givers.

Victor Lee is the owner of imVictorLee.com. Passionate in Affiliate Marketing, Personal Development and Training, Victor hopes to equip more people with skills and knowledge not just to make money online, but to have financial and time freedom for the things that matter most.
Click Here if you would like an opportunity to work with Victor.
About The Author

Victor Lee

Victor Lee is the owner of imVictorLee.com. Passionate in Affiliate Marketing, Personal Development and Training, Victor hopes to equip more people with skills and knowledge not just to make money online, but to have financial and time freedom for the things that matter most. Click Here if you would like an opportunity to work with Victor.

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